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How will Ferrari 812 GTS hold its value?

Discussion in 'FF/Lusso/F12/812S' started by nimamd, Mar 8, 2020.

  1. tfazio

    tfazio Formula 3
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    I think in most cases your thinking would be correct. I think lower production numbers will help the 812's depreciation curve compared to the F12 due to the amount made of each. I anticipate there will be a lot less 812 Superfast than F12's for example.

    However, there has not been a non-special series V12 Ferrari spider available in many years. There is a lot of demand for this car and I do think individuals who generally get the rear mid-engine Spider will look to the 812 GTS on the secondary market to just try it out. Don't get me wrong the 812 GTS will definitely depreciate I just do not think at the same level you have seen on the 812 Superfast. I could be wrong. Let's check back on this thread in a few years.
     
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  2. Avia11

    Avia11 Formula Junior
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    Jan 21, 2017
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    Is it true that the 812 GTS is going to be produced in smaller numbers than the 812SF? Does anyone know that? From some of these threads I wonder if the new 812 VS is going to be a turbo assisted V12? any info on this?
     
  3. marky1

    marky1 Formula 3
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    Will be years before things are like they have been again, perhaps never. Maybe the Limited edition specials but everything else forget it. Normal car depreciation is to resume.
     
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  4. Scraggy

    Scraggy Formula 3
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    You are respectfully wrong, the 550 Barchetta and 575SA were deeply unpopular new with horrid depreciation until v recently. Now at inflated prices but almost zero demand.
     
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  5. tfazio

    tfazio Formula 3
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    Hi Scraggy, I said the 812 GTS will hold its value better than and 812 Superfast and F12. It will depreciate slower than its coupe counterparts. You do not agree with that? That really wasn't a bold statement on my part.

    You are talking about special series and limited production cars. The 550 Barchetta was considerably more expensive than a normal 550 Maranello and the price difference between the 575SA versus the 575M was even greater. That was likely the reason for their initial horrid depreciation that and perhaps the market for the Barchetta was limited due to it not having a more conventional convertible top.

    The 812 GTS is only about $30K USD more than an 812 Superfast. That is not much different than the premium one pays for an F8 Spider.

    Have you driven an 812 Superfast before? If so were you not blown away by its performance? Now think of driving an 812 with the roof down. It is going to be an extraordinarily fun car to drive. Likely the last of naturally aspirated non-Hybrid V12 Ferrari offers as well. There will be no issues with the top as the design is similar to that on the 458/488/F8 Spider. It is not a complicated mechanism and should not be a concern down the road. Also, the 812 GTS will be reliable, and the service will be free for 7 years. These are just a few of the reasons why I do not see the 812 GTS taking the same depreciation curve we are accustomed to seeing on V12 Ferrari's over the last 5-8 years.
     
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  6. TWCC

    TWCC Rookie

    Apr 27, 2020
    46
    the 30k difference is theoretical...in reality you get a delivery mile SF at 20-30% discount...so in effect the price difference is 100k+
     
  7. Scraggy

    Scraggy Formula 3
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    All fair and reasonable points, and yes I am on my second SF but I cancelled my GTS order. I am sure it will be fabulous and do enjoy, I personally am a little tired of the Ferrari process and new car pricing. More importantly I find the design a bit lazy and wish they had used a fabric roof. There are so good now and in my opinion look sporty and can be lighter. I think they were a little lazy with design also, it’s a Targa.

    As per the post above in UK£ a beautiful 812 can be had for £240 now, a really top end GTS spec will be £410. So a big price to change. I bought a second hand 911 Turbo S Cab which I am enjoying, as well. I sold my Pista Spider, beautiful car but not really useable.

    Keep safe and enjoy your car, it will be fabulous. Just not for me.
     
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  8. Scraggy

    Scraggy Formula 3
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    On values I am surprised how close F12 and 812 pricing is get, I have had both and find the 812 much superior. Neither are beauties. Compared to say a DBS or 275 but very few recent Ferrari’s are beautiful. Market seems to rate F12 well against 812 in peoples affections.
     
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  9. tomc

    tomc F1 World Champ

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    What do you like about the 812 > F12? Also, in your opinion, does the all-wheel steering constitute a major improvement for 812 > F12?
    Similar question in regards to electronic power steering, which I understand the 812 has, but F12 does not. Thanks for your thoughts...T
     
  10. rob lay

    rob lay Administrator
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    F12 + $50k
     
  11. Scraggy

    Scraggy Formula 3
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    I love both, 812 perhaps fells slightly smaller and a touch quicker. Sort of a comfy Tdf.

    I think both will do well and converge as what people really dislike is the pre dual clutch boxes.
     
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  12. Thecadster

    Thecadster Formula 3
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    I posted this review a while back. As a previous owner of a F12 and a current owner of a 812, I feel like I am well-positioned to discuss the differences as I see them. I wrote this last summer after taking delivery of my 812. I hope this helps.

    If I’m honest with myself, I was more than a little concerned about the price walk between my perfectly awesome F12 and the 812. The dollar gap’s considerable and I was worried that the juice might not be worth the squeeze. Even though I had the opportunity to thrash a new 812 at Road Atlanta as part of Corsa Pilota last summer, I still wondered how it might work for my primary driving, which largely consists of carving up the twisty’s in North Carolina. I felt then, and still do now, that the F12 is 85-90% of the 812. That extra 10-15% has a considerable price. To me though, in the end, it was worth it. And I say this as an unabashed superfan of the F12. Here is what makes the 812 worth the price of admission:
    • 4WS - This new addition goes a long ways to reducing the overall feel of size and heft that is ever-present in the F12. Both cars are remarkably nimble, but the 4WS presents a significant upgrade.
    • Gearbox - The shifts are much quicker, especially the downshifts. My biggest gripe on the F12 was the relatively slow downshift. Compared to my Performante, it felt very much DCT 1.0. The 812 removes that criticism altogether. Added bonus is the shifts come quicker, which means there’s more of them. Also, they are more authoritative, not so much a slam (like a single clutch Aventador), but just very much both quick and abrupt.
    • Noise - Hard to improve on the F12, but the 812 is louder, which for me, is a huge win. To my ear, the cold start is much much louder.
    • Power - The F12 is freakishly overpowered. It’s a white knuckled affair every time you slam the accelerator. The 812 is even more powerful, and shockingly, the power upgrade is readily apparent.
    • Confidence inspiring - Despite the obvious power upgrade, the 812 is more planted and creates far more assurance and certainty. The F12 always had a Jekyll and Hyde quality that I found endearing, but the 812 gently shifts towards Jekyll and away from Hyde.
    • Turn in - I actually really liked the light and fast steering feel in the F12 and I always thought the turn in was surprisingly engaging. The 812 is greatly refined in its steering feel and directional control.
    • My spec - The 812 is my first time creating a Ferrari spec and I love how it turned out. My worry regarding the spec took on a life of its own over the last several months, but all that trepidation was for naught. It’s exactly how I wanted it to be. Added bonus, my wife loves the spec. She actually called it “elegant and tasteful”. This last part is special as my wife is completely nonplussed on my car addiction. That she actually likes the 812 is an unexpected windfall. (For context, she thinks my Rosso Mars Performante is silly, maybe even a little douc***.)
    Bottom line, the 812 is a massive step forward from the already perfectly incredible F12. It’s a forever car for me and I look forward to many years and miles spent thoroughly exploring its capabilities and personality.
     
  13. tomc

    tomc F1 World Champ

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    Thanks. Totally missed the original post!
    T
     
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  14. gliazzurri

    gliazzurri Karting

    Jun 11, 2016
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    That’s a great description and very helpful to read. Thanks for the effort on that post.
     
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  15. ibesuc

    ibesuc Formula Junior

    Jun 16, 2009
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    My first impression ... 812 GTS, as the first production open top V12 Ferrari in many years, will not appreciate like the previous LE open tops and instead likely depreciate like most normal, used V12 Ferraris do (significantly). Could be wrong though, especially if this ends up being the last N/A/non-electric V12 Ferrari.

    Of course production numbers are a more clearcut way to tell.

    I was also surprised that the GTS is not much more (by Ferrari standards) than the regular SF. Guess that goes back to it being a production car and not an LE.
     

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