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Newbie Motorcycle riders FAQ's and Answers Thread

Discussion in 'Motorcycles & Boats' started by rsvmille676, May 4, 2006.

  1. Dave328

    Dave328 Formula 3

    Nov 24, 2002
    2,133
    New Orleans
    Full Name:
    Dave
    +2 on the SV here too! (although I'd lean a little more towards a Monster 695 myself! ;) )

    Dave
     
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  3. Ispeed

    Ispeed Karting

    Oct 31, 2005
    230
    Needham MA
    Full Name:
    Carl
    I have just stumbled onto this thread, very good advice for the uninitiated.

    I give another vote to the V twin sport bike over any in-line 4 cylinder. The twin puts out controllable power and gives you confidence in most situations.
    I have 22 years of motocross racing and probably only 10 years of sport riding on the street. I would recommend learning on the dirt with an xr100 if someone is new to motorcycles. There you will learn what the bike is trying to do without any bad consequences.

    -Wear good leather, and gloves.
    -Be safe!!
     
  4. cantdecide

    cantdecide Karting

    Jun 28, 2004
    52
    Louisville KY
    Full Name:
    Matt Hnderson
    I agree with learning on the dirt, if you are totally new to bikes. The difference comes in braking. The rear is used a LOT more in the dirt than on the street. I experienced this a few months ago on an XR100 owned by a friend. I was having an absolute blast playing in the mud/dirt. I wheelied towards my friend, set the front down and got on the brakes kind of hard. I had been riding streetbikes exclusively for years till that day, so I grabbed a big handful of front brake on instinct. The knobby locked up on wet grass and down I went! Nothing hurt but my pride though, definitely reminded me of the difference between street and dirt riding. I have since bought a CBR 1100, and it has linked brakes. This is nice for cruising speeds, you can use the 'back' brake a lot more than usual as it grabs some front also. When you turn it up a notch though, you still want to use the front almost exclusively, as the back WILL lock up and slide around on you. Interesting concept, I am still up in the air on how much I like it. The bike itself though, I could not ask for a better all around motorcycle!!
     
  5. Fnix

    Fnix Karting

    Jun 23, 2007
    73
    Orlando, Florida
    I'm thinking of getting a Ninja 250 to commute to and from work. I never rode a motorcycle before.
     
  6. SKXF430

    SKXF430 Karting

    Oct 19, 2004
    164
    W. Los Angeles
    That's a good bike to start on but take the MSF course too. Ride long and ride safe. :)
     
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  8. Fnix

    Fnix Karting

    Jun 23, 2007
    73
    Orlando, Florida
    Guys at work recomend I get a 650 so I can ride with them. Said the 250 wouldnt be able to keep up on interstate riding and I would get tired of the 250 quickly.
     
  9. shakazulu12

    shakazulu12 Formula Junior

    Feb 3, 2004
    545
    Portland, OR
    Full Name:
    Preston
    Buy a used 250 for 1800 bucks, ride it for six months, then sell it for what you paid for it. Then move to something bigger based upon your personal experience.

    Are you going to be cruising on the highway in a straight line for long distances? If they are riding twisties, then the deficit, while noticable, will not be as bad as you think. I ride a 400 and am never left behind unless we hit an area with long straights. Even then, up to about 100 its not that big a deal and you shouldn't be riding much faster than that on the streets anyway.

    If they ride cruisers, then its not that big a deal from a power standpoint, but comfort issues pop up if you are slabbing down the highway on a sportbike for a long time. However, the 250 appears to have a fairly upright riding position. I have been on many rides with people with 250's and they are fine up to about 80mph
     
  10. Fnix

    Fnix Karting

    Jun 23, 2007
    73
    Orlando, Florida
    They like to ride the interstates 50+ miles plus on 1000cc+ bikes. I am sure they go above 100 most of the time
     
  11. shakazulu12

    shakazulu12 Formula Junior

    Feb 3, 2004
    545
    Portland, OR
    Full Name:
    Preston
    Whats the point in that? Straightline cruising? Sorry if that sounds offensive. But riding the interstates at high speed gets really boring, pretty fast.
     
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  13. Choptop

    Choptop F1 Rookie

    Aug 15, 2004
    4,455
    Carmichael, CA
    Full Name:
    Alan Galbraith
    dont ride with them.
     
  14. Dave328

    Dave328 Formula 3

    Nov 24, 2002
    2,133
    New Orleans
    Full Name:
    Dave
    +1 on Alan and Prestons advice!
    As a newbie the last thing you need is to try and hang with guys who haul ass down the hwy!
    I made that mistake when I first started riding. I was trying to keep up with a pack of guys on 999's and R1's in some twisties, and I got in over my head REAL quick! Double that since I was on a Monster! Used Ninja 260 or SV650 are the way to go, then move up to the bike you really want when you get some miles under your butt. Of course, I didn't take my own advice, I went straight for a Monster as my first bike ever, but you know what they say about hindsight and all that! ;)

    Dave
     
  15. Fnix

    Fnix Karting

    Jun 23, 2007
    73
    Orlando, Florida
    We need to ride a while on the interstate to get the our destinations.
     
  16. shakazulu12

    shakazulu12 Formula Junior

    Feb 3, 2004
    545
    Portland, OR
    Full Name:
    Preston
    Gotcha, still sounds like the wrong crew for you to be around when you are learning.
     
  17. FerrariF50lover

    FerrariF50lover Formula 3

    Aug 12, 2005
    2,347
    Ohio
    Full Name:
    Nate
    #114 FerrariF50lover, Aug 24, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2008
    Im looking to buy a bike this winter. I have ridden basically every motorized recreational vehical known to man kind for a while. Ive ridden dirtbikes since Ive been 5 and quads and sleds not to far after. I know my limits and dont try to push them. Ive been looking at litre bikes 05+ R1's, CBR'S, ZXR,s and GSXR's. I love all the bikes and would be happy with any of them. My question is for you guys am I getting in over my head. I know this ultimately depends on me as a person and a rider. It would only be rode about 2 times a week during nice days and nights. Full gear is not even a question for me I will always wear boots, pants, a jacket, and gloves when I ride.
     
  18. Choptop

    Choptop F1 Rookie

    Aug 15, 2004
    4,455
    Carmichael, CA
    Full Name:
    Alan Galbraith
    yes

    even for the experienced street/trackday rider the new crop of 1000's are extreme overkill. On the track they are to be handled with kid gloves. Not say they are dangerous...as the old adage goes, the most dangerous part of any motorcycle is the nut that holds the handle bars (YOU).

    Can you get a 1000 and ride it in a sane manner? yep. They are great bikes that are pushing 170-180hp off the showroom floor. You CAN get in dutch VERY quickly with them.

    For a first time street rider, even with some dirt experience I would recommend a smaller bike to start on the street. The 600's are amazing bikes, as is the Triumph 675 and the Gixxer 750 (my vote for the best all around race replica style bike).
     
  19. parkerfe

    parkerfe F1 World Champ

    Sep 4, 2001
    12,887
    Cumming, Georgia
    Full Name:
    Franklin E. Parker
    Not only should you wear a Snell certified helmet and body armor, boots and gloves, but you should also remember to replace your helmet if it has been dropped or involved in an accident and/or every 2 t0 5 years even if it has not been dropped or involved in an accident as the outer shell, inner shell and chin strap deteriorates over time.. See the helmet manufacturer recommendation and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.
     
  20. parkerfe

    parkerfe F1 World Champ

    Sep 4, 2001
    12,887
    Cumming, Georgia
    Full Name:
    Franklin E. Parker
    You should use both the front and rear brakes simultaneously in most street situations. At track events or fast curvy road riding, proper use of (rear) trail braking is essential to carry the most speed into the apex.
     
  21. parkerfe

    parkerfe F1 World Champ

    Sep 4, 2001
    12,887
    Cumming, Georgia
    Full Name:
    Franklin E. Parker
    A slipper clutch helps prevent locking up the rear when down shifting in fast street and/or track riding...my 2008 Hayabusa will allow up shifts and down shifts without using the clutch at all...just click up or down
     
  22. Choptop

    Choptop F1 Rookie

    Aug 15, 2004
    4,455
    Carmichael, CA
    Full Name:
    Alan Galbraith
    what bike?
     
  23. FerrariF50lover

    FerrariF50lover Formula 3

    Aug 12, 2005
    2,347
    Ohio
    Full Name:
    Nate
    So would a GSXR750 be over kill? Ive been watching them closely on ebay and am keeping my eyes open for a 05+.
     
  24. SRT Mike

    SRT Mike Two Time F1 World Champ

    Oct 31, 2003
    23,199
    Taxachusetts
    Full Name:
    Raymond Luxury Yacht
    Here's the thing... people say "I will respect the bike" and "I will not push the limits".

    Well, a 1000cc sportbike has limits higher than just about everything else.

    So, if you say you aren't going to use what a 1,000cc bike has, why get a 1,000cc bike? The only reason to get one is so that you *can* use what it has, otherwise you wouldn't get it. The only other reason is not to appear like a chicken to your friends, but if your friends thing you're a chicken for not having a literbike, they ain't friends.

    There ain't too many people I've met who got a bike and never dropped it or never did something stupid. I am glad that when I dropped my bike and screwed it up, that I was riding a 1976 KZ650 instead of a brand new literbike with $1000's worth of plastic covering it.

    The other aspect is that a literbike is twitchy and a handful to ride - especially to ride fast. It's not just about being unable to handle the power, it's also about how much fun you're going to have. I really think that a new rider can't really find a bike that is going to be more FUN than a Ninja 250 or SV650. A 250 will faaar outhandle a 1000cc bike.

    The other thing about buying a used SV650 or Ninja 250 is that you will get just about all your $$ back, or even more if you buy it right. A literbike will depreciate just like a car does :)
     
  25. Choptop

    Choptop F1 Rookie

    Aug 15, 2004
    4,455
    Carmichael, CA
    Full Name:
    Alan Galbraith
    not reeeeeeeally... but its still a racebike with turn signals. Literally... It makes it fun to ride, but also pretty sharp edged.

    Personally I'm a big fan on the Gixxer 750. I race one. I dont ride it on the street, but thats because I rarely ride "quickly" or "rail the twisties" on the street. Just a function of doing so many trakdays and racing.

    the +05's are a pretty small bike. Its the 600 with a larger motor stuffed in it. Its a REALLY good combo.

    You can ride it safely if you are pretty dedicated to riding your own pace. Its still an extremely potent machine.

    Let me ask you this... what type of riding do you want to do?

    destination rides? railing in the twisties? trackdays? Just cruisin around town on a *****in race bike? a combo? (all are noble pursuits btw :D).
     
  26. FerrariF50lover

    FerrariF50lover Formula 3

    Aug 12, 2005
    2,347
    Ohio
    Full Name:
    Nate
    I will try to hit up some tracks, both drag racing at milan and road racing at mid ohio. Basically a combo of all minus the railing the twisties on the street, it seems to dangerous to me at this point(exspecially being a parking lot badass, we know the chicks love bikes) haha. Like I said Ive ridden all my life on dirt and want to get something street. I always hear people say your gonna get bored with a 600 since youve been riding so long. So I thought I could close that gap and get a 750 which is both in between a 600 and a 1000 and just fun to ride.
     
  27. Choptop

    Choptop F1 Rookie

    Aug 15, 2004
    4,455
    Carmichael, CA
    Full Name:
    Alan Galbraith
    the 750 is a great trackday bike.

    of you can keep your right hand in check its a nice bike.
     
  28. Axecent

    Axecent Formula 3

    Oct 15, 2008
    1,112
    Central Texas
    Full Name:
    John
    A 750 is just about as fast as a 1000 on most tracks. On the street, I can generally keep up with any sane person on a 60 HP bike if we are riding twisties. Starting riders should stick to SV 650 or lower HP bikes, unless they are just natural born riders. I love going out on my RVF 400 and keeping up with almost anything on tighter roads....much more satisfaction than screaming down the straights and throwing out the anchor in the turns. I've watched good riders keep up with repli racers of lesser talent in the twisties while riding their big ass GS BMW's....
     

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