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car design thread

Discussion in 'Creative Arts' started by jm2, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. Tenney

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    You bet - always a favorite - though Autorama/Ridler certainly not an unreasonable fix!
     
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  2. jm2

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  3. energy88

    energy88 F1 World Champ
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    Reading the findings in this study makes me wonder why Saturn failed. My impression when Saturn first emerged was that they were trying to do many of the suggestions advocated in this study.
     
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  4. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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  5. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    Oh, boy, this is a touchy subject in my checkered past.
    When they first announced the formation of the Saturn Brand, it was indeed supposed to be outside of GM's typical purvey.
    With great fanfare they way overpromised, and wound up paying a heavy price.
    I was part of the initial Saturn Design Studio from Day1. It went downhill from there, but that's a story for another time.

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  6. furmano

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    How was that last rendering created, the full size one? Airbrush? I'm thinking a rendering that size would soak up a lot of expensive markers!

    -F
     
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  7. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    Full-size airbrush, using either Luma dyes or Flomaster inks and Krylon spray paint. No one does these anymore. Toxic to say the least. Did many of these in the ‘70’s - ‘80’s. Image Unavailable, Please Login



    note the 288 GTO wheels! :eek:
     
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  8. of2worlds

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    I like the wide thin taillights on the black car! Plus a hint of upmarket Cadillac there TO. Red convertible reminds me of Porsche Speedster rear deck meets Pontiac Fiero front and side windows you can actually see out of.
     
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  9. furmano

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    Love it!

    How are 1:1 renderings created today? Everything is drawn on a Wacom, do they print out the 1:1 images on a large format printer, or what exactly?

    And "tape drawings" are still done, yes?

    -F
     
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  10. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    Most companies no longer do full size tape dwgs. BMW I Believe still do, but it’s become a lost art. No full size renderings anymore either. Many studios just blow up images created in the computer. I doubt young designers have ever seen an airbrush.
    I used to enjoy doing full size tape dwgs. Good way to quickly ‘block in’ a design in 1:1 scale.

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  11. of2worlds

    of2worlds F1 World Champ
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    Some really interesting images there! Any more details about the car below the PONTIAC name? Very sporty mid engine design?
    Also the black and gold cars towards the bottom looks like C4 Corvette meets 1967 Cadillac Eldorado, VERY cool!!!!! :cool:
    Huge greenhouse area, imagine what all that heavy glass high up on the body does for the handling prowess on those other cars...
     
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  12. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    The tape in the Pontiac Studio was a proposal for a concept car for Pontiac. During the ‘80’s-‘90’s Pontiac did a concept car every year.
    Those large uppers/greenhouse were the design dejour during that time period. Now it’s the ‘chopped top’ look in vouge. Like dress hemlines.........up & down with the times.
     
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  13. furmano

    furmano F1 World Champ
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    That makes sense.

    Video screens are large enough to view the 3D model at large scale and for full scale, the CAD can be projected onto a wall. VR is the next step, Ferrari shows it being used by them in the SF-90 factory video.

    But before going to a full scale physical model, 1:8 models are built, right? Designing a physical product in 3D CAD sucks.

    -F
     
  14. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    #9664 jm2, Jan 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
    Correct, but the scale models are usually 1/4 or 1/5. Sometimes 1/10. Depends on the company.
    The Design Power Walls allow the design teams to project images full size. This technology took over many years ago.



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  15. furmano

    furmano F1 World Champ
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    I memory of Syd Mead, an hour long video of his process from sketch to painted rendering. Talk about lost arts, no one will do it like this anymore.

    -F

     
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  16. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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    He was such visionary.
     
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  17. jm2

    jm2 F1 World Champ
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  18. jm2

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    More on Mr. Mead's lifelong achievements
    http://www.deansgarage.com/2020/syd-mead/
     
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  19. furmano

    furmano F1 World Champ
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    Ever since it came out I've always wanted to create a reimagined version of the FF, build a coupe on the extended chassis. I sketched up a concept and called it the GTB4 Lusso. It's kind of a mashup between styles, built on the same wheelbase as the GTC4 but with a lowered roof line and the cab moved forward several inches. Maybe this would be Ferrari's answer to McLaren's GT, a luxury sports car.

    -F
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  20. jm2

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    Design Essay: Is still possible to draw in Italian?
    https://www.cardesignnews.com/insights/design-essay-is-still-possible-to-draw-in-italian/40033.article?fbclid=IwAR09F-z5erhByK7DtdZoIQbKhZE8upstdaBTLg7ZZKTkT7Y5kePBsiYbayY



    Matteo Licata takes a brief look back at the history of Italian car design and asks if the same emotion can be replicated today

    Whenever someone mentions the words ’Italian Design,’ the mind automatically conjures up images from the ’Golden Thirties’ of the Carrozzeria. The three decades between 1950 and 1980 when a few small outfits located around Turin managed to rival Detroit for global automotive design dominance. Those days are, for better or worse, long gone. As an automobile historian hailing from Turin, I can’t help but wonder about the true meaning of those powerful two words and their real legacy, or if they ever meant anything at all. After all, many designers quietly employed by Turinese companies hailed from places far away from the river Po’s sleepy banks.

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    An Italian classic… designed by an American

    From the 124 Sport Spider designed by the American Tom Tjaarda to Japanese Ken Okuyama’s tenure as Pininfarina’s creative director, examples of cherished Italian classics penned by foreigners abound.

    On top of that, an ideal back catalogue of Italian design classics comprises a wide variety of cars extremely different in both concept and execution, ranging from the restrained elegance of the Cisitalia 202 to the boxy functionality of the original Fiat Panda and everything in between.

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    The original Panda by Giorgetto Giugiaro turns forty this year

    In the present day, storied brands like Alfa Romeo and Maserati make liberal use of the ’Italian Design’ expression when describing their current products, which often have strong retro influences and are designed by a very diverse team of professionals from all over the world. It is currently headed by a German. So the questions are: what does ’Italian Design’ mean today? Does it have some specific identifiable traits? Is it still possible to draw in Italian?

    A look at the timeless shape of the Cisitalia mentioned above, or even to the classic Fiat 500F that recently joined it in the MOMA’s collection, may lead us to argue that Italian design is about the perfect harmony of proportions and minimal, yet neat, detailing. But that’s what constitutes good car design no matter what – or at least it should be.

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    This 1965 500F was recently acquired by the MOMA

    At the other end of the spectrum, the Panda, Giorgetto Giugiaro’s functionalist masterpiece, owes perhaps more to the Ulm’s Hochschule für Gestaltung principles than it does to the Accademia Delle Belle Arti. Yet, at the same time, it has nothing of the severity that could come as a byproduct of a purely functionalist approach. Instead, its design has a degree of playfulness to it that is perhaps the real secret of its enduring appeal. The Panda is an intelligently designed car, but it doesn’t know it and therefore doesn’t take itself too seriously.

    This concept leads us to nicely to the ancient word ’Sprezzatura,’ coined by Baldassarre Castiglione early in the sixteenth century. This most Italian of words is now, strangely enough, more widely known elsewhere. Sprezzatura is the subtle art of making difficult tasks or performances look so easy and natural to seem completely effortless, even mundane by the person performing them. Achieving perfection seemingly without trying, much like the Ferrari 250 GTO or the Aston Martin DB4 GTZ.

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    Race cars don’t have to be pretty… but there are exceptions

    Sprezzatura doesn’t carry a passport: it’s inherently Italian yet universal at the same time. Many chase it, but few ever get there, and having a surname ending with a vowel won’t necessarily help. Therefore, if a ’trait d’union’ between the best cars designed in Italy does exist, it could be that they appear simple and made of almost nothing, yet they make a compelling and sometimes arresting statement. That’s what masters do.

    Think about the second, and perhaps more famous, part of “Another Brick In The Wall” by Pink Floyd. Any musician would tell you that it is a pretty straightforward song, dead easy to play by even the scrappiest music band. Yet it took considerable time and effort to compose, and it still resonates with pretty much everyone four decades after its release.

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    The Alfa Romeo 4C’s design was inspired by the 1967 33 Stradale

    Automobile Design’s whole raison d’être is and has always been, to generate a powerful emotional reaction, yet this foundational principle can easily get lost in the daily grind of oversized design studios and needlessly contrived internal politics.

    That’s why, during a recent talk I gave to design students, I stressed that great automobile design is made with love and out of love. I said that they should never lose the passion and drive that led them into a design academy in the first place, because each one of them has much better tools and will be much better prepared than any of his or her predecessors ever were.

    The secret of the old masters of Italian design, if they’ve ever had one, was their sheer love for the automobile and their work, full stop. That’s what I call ’draw in Italian.’ And the good news is that, while most of the names we now revere may be dead and buried, love and passion for the automobile won’t and never will be, if we don’t let it happen.
     
  21. tritone

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  22. jm2

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  23. jm2

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    The BAT cars. Three all time great designs.
    https://www.classicdriver.com/en/article/cars/how-bertones-batmobiles-became-holy-trinity-car-design?fbclid=IwAR1XRyHD9ZXj0SD-aHEOuymmLwlXcYx_YYwMx9M6CjIFTkZeA3XMBNOC6yM

    Magazine | Cars
    How Bertone’s ‘Batmobiles’ became the Holy Trinity of car design
    08 November 2019


    Created by the design wunderkind Franco Scaglione for Bertone, the visionary B.A.T. cars disrupted 1950s automotive culture and became undisputed icons of twentieth-century design. Now, together with Classic Driver, Phillips is offering the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see all three in London…


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    Visitors to the 1953 Turin Motor Show may have expected to see the latest production models from Alfa Romeo, Lancia and Fiat but they were certainly not prepared for what awaited them on the stand of the Bertone design studio. Christened Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica 5 – or B.A.T. 5 for short – the astounding show car was built on the chassis of the baroque Alfa Romeo 1900 SS saloon but featured a futuristic and voluptuously sculpted steel body, an aeroplane-style nose flanked by large air intakes, sweeping side flanks that concealed the wheels and an impressive pair of curved rear wings.

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    The other-worldly design had been shaped by Bertone’s creative mastermind Franco Scaglione and was heavily influenced by the flamboyant Jet Age styling that was in vogue in post-War America and translated the latest developments in aeronautic technology into the spheres of consumer products. Scaglione creatively masterminded the avant-garde jet-plane aesthetic with the sensibility for proportions and elegance for which Italy’s coachbuilding culture was so famous. He also gave the car his own personal twist.

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    B.A.T. 5 was not only stunning to look at but also highly aerodynamically efficient. In his initial brief for the project, Giuseppe ‘Nuccio’ Bertone had asked Scaglione to explore the outer borders of advanced design and create a body shape that would allow for the lowest possible coefficient of drag. During testing, the first Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica proved to be very streamlined and stable, even though Bertone had no wind tunnel and its engineers had to affix wool threads to the body and analyse potential turbulence at speed. Coach-built entirely by hand, the light, streamlined body allowed the modest two-litre twin-cam engine to propel Bertone’s ‘Batmobile’ to an impressive top speed of 200kph, considerably outpacing the Alfa Romeo saloon upon which it was based.

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    Lauded by the press and the public, B.A.T. 5 was followed by two further concept cars, B.A.T. 7 and B.A.T. 9, which were revealed at the Turin Motor Shows in 1954 and 1955, respectively, and took the initial idea to the next level. For B.A.T. 7, Scaglione reworked and fine-tuned the original formula to make the car even more streamlined and spectacular. The nose was lowered and the air openings smoothened, while the central spine stood out like a dorsal fin and the rear wings were even more dramatically curved than before. As a result, a drag coefficient of just 0.19cd was recorded, lower than virtually any production car you can buy today.

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    With B.A.T. 9, Franco Scaglione and the team at Bertone softened their dramatic styling approach in favour of a more production-oriented variation of the original theme that incorporated elements of Alfa Romeo’s contemporary design language. The nose was smoothened and featured Alfa Romeo’s trademark grille, the air intakes were reduced in size, the wheels were no longer covered, and the ‘bat’ wings had been cropped down akin to more moderate side fins. What had begun as an uncompromising aerodynamic and design exercise seemed destined to be heading towards production. But even though the prototypes were fully operational and even driven to motor shows on the public roads, Alfa Romeo never considered building a production version of the futuristic albeit impractical and hugely expensive B.A.T. cars. After their show appearances had been completed, the cars were sold to make way for new projects at the Bertone carrozzeria and design studios and wound up separated in America.They fell into various states of disrepair – B.A.T. 7 was even de-finned and raced – until they were united by a Southern Californian enthusiast in the 1980s.

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    The three concepts had helped ‘Nuccio’ Bertone to establish his design consultancy as an avant-garde thinktank for the automotive industry and strengthen the company’s bonds with Alfa Romeo. Franco Scaglione designed other iconic cars for the Milanese brand such as the elegant Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint, the Jet Age-inspired Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale and the alluringly beautiful Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Stradale. Yet to this day, the B.A.T. series is considered to be Scaglione’s magnum opus.

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    In retrospect, B.A.T. 5, B.A.T. 7 and B.A.T. 9 are among the most daring, uncompromising and futuristic automotive visions ever realised. Having been honoured at the prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1989 and again in 2005 and displayed at landmark exhibitions on automotive design in America, the B.A.T. trinity is today considered to be the world’s most mythical, desirable and valuable series of one-off collector cars. That Phillips – renowned for its 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Design and market-leading Watch departments – has now selected the three Bertone cars for their very first automotive exhibition is further proof that Franco Scaglione’s masterpieces rank among other icons and undisputed milestones of modern architecture, art and design.

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    The B.A.T. cars marked a turning point in automotive history. They were game changers much like the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Atomium in Brussels and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum in New York, each of which changed our ideas of what a building could be. They’re comparable to Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, René Magritte’s Ceci n’est pas une pipe and Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain, which fundamentally transformed our notion of art. And they can be likened to Marcel Breuer’s Wassily Chair, the de Havilland Comet, Marc Newson’s Lockheed Lounge and Apple’s iPhone with their enduring impact on the world of design.

    In this sense, the impact of the B.A.T. series was by no means limited to the world of cars. Inspiring generations of designers, it encouraged creative minds around the world to innovate and question the status quo, unfold their artistic potential, let their inspirations take the lead and, for once, reinvent the wheel.

    Photos: Tom Shaxson for Phillips / Classic Driver © 2019
     
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  24. energy88

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