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94 512TR 66,000 mile major

Discussion in 'Boxers/TR/M' started by JIMBO, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. vincenzo

    vincenzo F1 Rookie

    Nov 2, 2003
    2,665
    Clyde said:
    “I’ve never seen a carbon seal go bad and what ever you do don’t pressure test the system
    That will induce a failure in the seal, I’ve seen it trust me”

    Why would pressuring the seal up to operating pressure +/-18psi induce a failure?
     
  2. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Atlanta Georgia
    Full Name:
    Clarence Romero
    In order for a carbon seal to be totally effective it has to be hot
    That’s the design specs of any carbon seal
    These are the same seals that were used on the jet engines of planes I flew
    When cold they leak, not a lot but they can leak
    A cold carbon seal will leak under pressure that is not up to normal temperatures
    It’s fragile by design especially on the series 1 and 2 TR cars
    I call early TR,s series 1 and 512 TRs series 2
    The only way I’ve seen a carbon seal leak when hot is if the seal is punctured
    And that I’ve never seen this on a car
    Before I became a pilot I was an A&P mechanic and worked on jet engines
    Early carbon seals had this issue due to filtration issues of the oil, which would puncture the seals and cause engine failures
    Subsequently carbon seals gave way in some places on jet engines to labyrinth seals where heat wasn’t an issue mostly around the
    Compressor area
    If you pressure test a cold TR coolant system I can assure you you will see water coming from the pump area
    I’ve seen it
    After the car is hot
    It seals and never leaks again
    Hope this answers your question
    Clyde
     
  3. vincenzo

    vincenzo F1 Rookie

    Nov 2, 2003
    2,665
    #53 vincenzo, Oct 5, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019
    Clyde,
    I can appreciate that you may have seen a ceramic seal leak at room temperature, but I can unequivocally assure you that temperature was not the cause.

    Ceramic seals are the first choice for sealing in cryogenic applications as well as high heat applications. Our automotive temperature ranges are essentially irrelevant to a ceramic seal’s effectiveness.

    Have a look:
    “Due to the ability of the axial movement of the seat wear and ther- mal expansion are compensated automatically, both sealing parts stay in permanent contact. Carbon graphite rings in combination with a metal or ceramic counterpart are most common used materi- als. O-rings provide secondary static sealing. “

    https://www.slac.stanford.edu/pubs/slacpubs/16750/slac-pub-16847.pdf

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  4. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Atlanta Georgia
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    Clarence Romero
    Sir
    Thank you you that paper
    Very interesting read
    I welcome the input
    That has not been my experience with carbon seals both on the aviation and automobile side of the house.
    Clyde Romero
     
  5. JIMBO

    JIMBO Formula 3
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    Oct 31, 2003
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    Welcome Clyde.
    Thanks for all the input. I just got back from my annual golf trip. The 1600 mile round trip drive has always been performed by the 512TR, and it was missed this year, but my Titan made the journey without complaint (and packing was a lot easier).
    Tomorrow I will get back to the engine service and answer your questions.
     
  6. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Clarence Romero
    Glad you had a safe trip
    This conversation might be better over the phone if you like, I could cover more quickly that way, your choice
    I live in Atlanta and I am retired so if you want give me a call and we can talk 678 6419932 cell
    Hit me up with a message with your cell So I know it’s you and to answer
    Also have you done the relay mod to your cooling fans and condenser fans?
    The starting amperage on the fans is a whopping 25 amps and every fuse box I’ve seen on a series 1 and 2 car has had major arcing
    On the fuses associated with the fans
    It’s not if, it’s when you will have a fuse box go bad because of this Issue, the fuse box melts like a Hersey bars in the sun!
    One more thing and I will go away until I here from you
    The stock radiators will eventually leak from the bottom, i was instrumental in getting wizard cooling to fabricated all aluminum ones that fit in a 512, the results are fantastic, the car cools done rapidly, and when you park it the fans stay on maximum 40 seconds, they cool so well, yes you can replace the radiators with the engine in, been there done that, however it’s so much more easier with the engine out.
    That’s it I am done, call, text, write at your discretion
    Clyde
     
  7. JIMBO

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    Thanks, Clyde. The new radiators seem interesting if not too cost prohibitive.
    My cell is 941-504-2152. I will try to call tomorrow, Thursday.
    The cooling fans for the condensor were replaced 2 years ago and all high amp circuits are on relays.
    I'm getting new Crank sensors (a Kia part 0K2A6 18891 Sensor - Crankshaft angle)) and new EGR valves (AC Delco 219-419). I wish we had met before I bought a new shim kit, but thanks anyway. What tool are you speaking of? How did you lock your cams during belt change?
    I'm working on the O2 sensors with my NAPA guy (I think it's Bosch 0258 003 222).
    Do you have a part number or interchange for the thermostats? I'm converting to Evans zero pressure coolant.
     
  8. JIMBO

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    Also, silicone hoses for the coolant. The asbestos sheath sounds like a great idea, but I have never experienced vapor lock in the clutch. I have the Hill Engineering throwout bearing,a MUCH better engineered unit
     
  9. JIMBO

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  10. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Clarence Romero
    Give me call tomorrow we can talk then I am around the house all day
    Interesting on the KIA part numbers for the hall sensors
    You got lucky there, me I am never that lucky with stuff like that
    How did you find that out?
    The tool is for depressing the bucket down and hold it down to remove the valve shim
    You can use mine
    I just removed the valve covers and aligned the marks then removed the belts after I marked the crankshaft with paint
    But to be honest you most likely don’t have to do a valve adjustment
    They don’t really move until around 80k or so
    Thermostats are BMW I can get that for you so hang in there
    Not familiar with that coolant, we both live in a warm climate, just use Preston
     
  11. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Clarence Romero
    Nice catch
    Have the Hill stuff on my car as well
    Check your front engine seal for oil vapor and leaks
    Call me tomorrow
    Until then
     
  12. Clyde Romero

    Clyde Romero Formula Junior

    Sep 6, 2019
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    Clarence Romero
  13. JIMBO

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    Which one? Two are listed.
    MOTORAD 248174 {#24874} OE Standard; 174F Info
    Category: Thermostat
    Choose
    [Private Label Package] (Only 2 Remaining) ($9.79)


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    $9.79
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    MOTORAD 248174JV {#24875} OE Standard; 174F; w/ Jiggle Pin Weep Hole Info
    Category: Thermostat



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    $12.01
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  14. JIMBO

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  15. JIMBO

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  16. JIMBO

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  17. JIMBO

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    AC compressor, same as alternator - electrical connector, 17 mm pivot, 13 mm nut from tension adjusting bracket.
    If your AC system is running cool, you may want to leave the system intact and remove the AC compressor with hoses attached BEFORE removing the engine. Use two BIG adjustable wrenches to remove the large AC lines if you are leaving the compressor attached to the engine during removal. This will vent the system and require removal of all air before recharging (but you knew that).
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  18. JIMBO

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  19. JIMBO

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  20. JIMBO

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  21. JIMBO

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    Next up: Valve covers.
     
  22. JIMBO

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    For the valve covers, start by removing the two 10 mm bolts on the plug wire cover, then gently pop off each plug wire and remove the entire coil/plug assembly in one piece.
    The fuel rail and injectors come off in one unit also. Unscrew the large round electrical connection under the intake runners and disconnect the vacuum line. Then remove the four 10 mm acorn nuts that hold the fuel rail to the intake. Now GENTLY pry out each injector (they are held in by o-rings) and remove complete assembly.

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  23. JIMBO

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  24. JIMBO

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    Valve covers:
    Remove spark plugs (19 mm).
    Remove two 10 mm nuts that hold hose fitting on bottom of valve cover and remove fitting.
    Remove eighteen 10 mm acorn nuts from valve cover. Remove 10 mm nuts on rear cam end plates. On RH side the intake contains the cam timing sensor. Remove the three 8 mm nuts and cover, exposing three 5 mm allen (hex) head bolts. Remove also. Carefully remove valve covers.
    My electrical connector plastic housings on the cam phase sensor crumbled as they were disassembled. After considerable research I have found a source for new ones. They should arrive next week and hopefully they will be correct. If so, I will post a link to the source. Image Unavailable, Please Login Image Unavailable, Please Login
     
  25. JIMBO

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    Now we do the valves.
    First, remove the perforated aluminum plate on the rear top of the engine, exposing a view of the flywheel.
    Again, 10 mm acorn nuts and washers.
    Inside you will see a pointer.
    Next rotate engine clockwise (always clockwise) using the large nut on the crank pulley until the timing marks on the back of the cams line up and you see PM (Ponte Morte, dead point or Top Dead Center in American terms). Mark the flywheel. I also marked the cams to make it visually easy to see. I used a 1 7/16" socket on the crank since I did not have really big metric sockets
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